Desobedientzia zibila - 6

Süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 1236
Unikal süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 571
8.7 süzlär 2000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
11.7 süzlär 5000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
14.7 süzlär 8000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
Härber sızık iñ yış oçrıy torgan 1000 süzlärneñ protsentnı kürsätä.
ads place
fatally interrupt him.

I know that most men think differently
from myself; but those whose lives are by
profession devoted to the study of these
or kindred subjects content me as little as
any. Statesmen and legislators, standing
so completely within the institution, never
distinctly and nakedly behold it. They speak
of moving society, but have no restingplace without it. They may be men of a
certain experience and discrimination, and
have no doubt invented ingenious and even
useful systems, for which we sincerely
thank them; but all their wit and usefulness
lie within certain not very wide limits.
They are wont to forget that the world is
not governed by policy and expediency.
Webster never goes behind government,
and so cannot speak with authority about it.
His words are wisdom to those legislators
who contemplate no essential reform in the
existing government; but for thinkers, and
those who legislate for all tim, he never once
glances at the subject. I know of those whose
serene and wise speculations on this theme
would soon reveal the limits of his mind’s
range and hospitality. Yet, compared with
the cheap professions of most reformers,
and the still cheaper wisdom an eloquence
of politicians in general, his are almost the
only sensible and valuable words, and we
thank Heaven for him. Comparatively, he
is always strong, original, and, above all,
practical. Still, his quality is not wisdom,
but prudence. The lawyer’s truth is not
Truth, but consistency or a consistent
expediency. Truth is always in harmony
with herself, and is not concerned chieÁy
to reveal the justice that may consist with
wrong-doing. He well deserves to be called,
as he has been called, the Defender of the
Constitution. There are really no blows to
be given him but defensive ones. He is not

a leader, but a follower. His leaders are the
men of ‘87. “I have never made an effort,”
he says, “and never propose to make an
effort; I have never countenanced an effort,
and never mean to countenance an effort, to
disturb the arrangement as originally made,
by which various States came into the
Union.” Still thinking of the sanction which
the Constitution gives to slavery, he says,
“Because it was part of the original compact-let it stand.” Notwithstanding his special
acuteness and ability, he is unable to take a
fact out of its merely political relations, and
behold it as it lies absolutely to be disposed
of by the intellect--what, for instance, it
behooves a man to do here in American
today with regard to slavery--but ventures,
or is driven, to make some such desperate
answer to the following, while professing
to speak absolutely, and as a private man-from which what new and singular of social
duties might be inferred? “The manner,”
says he, “in which the governments of the
States where slavery exists are to regulate
it is for their own consideration, under the
responsibility to their constituents, to the
general laws of propriety, humanity, and
justice, and to God. Associations formed
elsewhere, springing from a feeling of
humanity, or any other cause, have nothing
whatever to do with it. They have never
received any encouragement from me and
they never will.
They who know of no purer sources of
truth, who have traced up its stream no
higher, stand, and wisely stand, by the Bible
and the Constitution, and drink at it there
with reverence and humanity; but they who
behold where it comes trickling into this
lake or that pool, gird up their loins once
more, and continue their pilgrimage toward
its fountainhead.

No man with a genius for legislation has
appeared in America. They are rare in the
history of the world. There are orators,
politicians, and eloquent men, by the
thousand; but the speaker has not yet opened
his mouth to speak who is capable of settling
the much-vexed questions of the day. We
love eloquence for its own sake, and not for
any truth which t may utter, or any heroism
it may inspire. Our legislators have not yet
learned the comparative value of free trade
and of freed, of union, and of rectitude, to
a nation. They have no genius or talent for
comparatively humble questions of taxation
and Ànance, commerce and manufactures
and agriculture. If we were left solely to the
wordy wit of legislators in Congress for our
guidance, uncorrected by the seasonable
experience and the effectual complaints of
the people, America would not long retain
her rank among the nations. For eighteen
hundred years, though perchance I have no
right to say it, the New Testament has been
written; yet where is the legislator who has
wisdom and practical talent enough to avail
himself of the light which it sheds on the
science of legislation.
The authority of government, even such
as I am willing to submit to--for I will
cheerfully obey those who know and can
do better than I, and in many things even
those who neither know nor can do so well-is still an impure one: to be strictly just, it
must have the sanction and consent of the
governed. It can have no pure right over
my person and property but what I concede
to it. The progress from an absolute to a
limited monarchy, from a limited monarchy
to a democracy, is a progress toward a true
respect for the individual. Even the Chinese
philosopher was wise enough to regard the
individual as the basis of the empire. Is a

democracy, such as we know it, the last
improvement possible in government? Is it
not possible to take a step further towards
recognizing and organizing the rights of
man? There will never be a really free and
enlightened State until the State comes to
recognize the individual as a higher and
independent power, from which all its
own power and authority are derived, and
treats him accordingly. I please myself with
imagining a State at last which can afford to
be just to all men, and to treat the individual
with respect as a neighbor; which even
would not think it inconsistent with its own
repose if a few were to live aloof from it,
not meddling with it, nor embraced by it,
who fulÀlled all the duties of neighbors and
fellow men. A State which bore this kind
of fruit, and suffered it to drop off as fast
as it ripened, would prepare the way for a
still more perfect and glorious State, which
I have also imagined, but not yet anywhere
seen.

Henry D. Thoreau-ren DESOBEDIENTZIA ZIBILA Mens agitat molem
bildumaren 0. zenbakia da. 2010eko urtarrilaren 5ean inprimatu genuen, eguzki eklipserik gabeko ilbeherarekin batera. Edizio honek
zenbakitutako 1003 alek osatzen dute.
Eskerrak: Joxe Manuel Odriozola, Juanma Sarasola,
Urtzi Urkizu, Pipi, Iñigo Biain eta
OSTIELA!-ko Jon Aranori.

alea

DESOBEDIENTZIA ZIBILA
Henry D. Thoreau

Argitaratzen du: potxo edizioak
Azala: Joxan Iza
Sarrera: Markos Zapiain
Itzulpena: Edu Lartzanguren
Ilustrazioak: Aitor Bolinaga eta Johnson
Maketazioa: Roberto Maiztegi
Edizioaren arduraduna: Patxi Hipólito
ISBN: 978-84-613-7411-3
SS-1630-2009
1. edizioa: 2010eko negua
K3 inprimategia, Bergara.
Euskal Herrian inprimatua

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  • Desobedientzia zibila - 1
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    Unikal süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 1990
    25.2 süzlär 2000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    37.1 süzlär 5000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    43.2 süzlär 8000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    Härber sızık iñ yış oçrıy torgan 1000 süzlärneñ protsentnı kürsätä.
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    Süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 3703
    Unikal süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 1935
    26.6 süzlär 2000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    37.6 süzlär 5000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    44.8 süzlär 8000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    Härber sızık iñ yış oçrıy torgan 1000 süzlärneñ protsentnı kürsätä.
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    Süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 3843
    Unikal süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 1901
    30.5 süzlär 2000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    43.4 süzlär 5000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    51.8 süzlär 8000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    Härber sızık iñ yış oçrıy torgan 1000 süzlärneñ protsentnı kürsätä.
  • Desobedientzia zibila - 4
    Süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 4445
    Unikal süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 1759
    17.3 süzlär 2000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    23.0 süzlär 5000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    26.8 süzlär 8000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    Härber sızık iñ yış oçrıy torgan 1000 süzlärneñ protsentnı kürsätä.
  • Desobedientzia zibila - 5
    Süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 5144
    Unikal süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 1306
    1.6 süzlär 2000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    2.2 süzlär 5000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    3.3 süzlär 8000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    Härber sızık iñ yış oçrıy torgan 1000 süzlärneñ protsentnı kürsätä.
  • Desobedientzia zibila - 6
    Süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 1236
    Unikal süzlärneñ gomumi sanı 571
    8.7 süzlär 2000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    11.7 süzlär 5000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    14.7 süzlär 8000 iñ yış oçrıy torgan süzlärgä kerä.
    Härber sızık iñ yış oçrıy torgan 1000 süzlärneñ protsentnı kürsätä.